Preparing an Exit Strategy…From Cancer!

exit

Author’s Note:  So many people thought this was about death, that I had to insert “from cancer” so everyone didn’t think I was exiting life.  That’s the FARTHEST thing from my mind!

My background is in business, so I keep in touch with my roots these days, mostly through my husband (a Finance guy).  He had a Schneider Downs (a local tax auditing firm) newsletter laying around and I read an article entitled above.  As I read it, I noticed the parallels between selling a business and beating cancer.  I credit the author, Mr. Imran S. Mohiuddin for the inspiration behind this blog post.

From Day 2, (Day 1, I was convinced I was going to die) my whole strategy was to beat cancer.  It was in fact an exit strategy.  Much like an intent to sell a business and make a profit, I had to develop a plan to get where I needed to be.  The “profit” would be coming out the other side better than I was before I fell ill.  I budgeted myself 2 years to get to cancer free, and 5 years to kick it completely.  So far, my plan and God’s plan (I’m a “God” girl…) match.  A friend of mine asked me recently, “What turned the corner for you? What was it that gave you the strength to fight and win?”  Good question.  I told her it was ultimately my mind and my attitude.  Once I convinced myself that I was going live, live well, and not let cancer stand in the way of my LIFE, that was it.  I shifted into “exit strategy from cancer” mode, and I never looked back.

I changed my entire diet, sleeping habits, exercise/fitness regimen, stress load, and perspective.  In his article, Imran says “Start by Building a Core Team”, and that’s exactly what I did.  I have a team of “skilled advisors” who I assembled early in my process.  I call them my “inner circle” and they know who they are.  I have a lot of “friends” and “family”, but I found out through a counselor that not all “friends” and “family” can handle a serious illness.  Some just flake out.  I hear from my inner circle during EVERY SINGLE treatment week, and there have been 35 to date.  They have BEEN THERE for me, rock solid when I needed them the most.  I will treasure these people eternally and their steadfastness and loyalty are what have brought me to where I am today.  I have many supporters but my inner circle have the “off social media” version of what’s really going on with me…good and bad.

Furthermore, Imran credits “well-organized files, powerful reporting capabilities, and tight operational controls” for higher valuations.  I couldn’t agree more!  I am EXTREMELY organized, I am super tough, and I don’t take B.S. from anyone!  I think those are cancer warrior layman’s terms for Imran’s advice of getting the most bang for my cancer-kicking buck!

He states “regardless of valuation, the owner must continue to operate and grow the business.”  I compare that to never slacking off in my fight and remaining vigilant no matter what.  Just when you think it’s safe to go back in the water, sneaky cancer throws you a curve ball.  So you always have to stay on top of your game.  Can’t let up, even for a second.  It requires tremendous discipline.

Finally, Imran discusses marketing.  I have taken my fight public in an effort to “attract serious buyers”; cancer warriors who want to follow my plan and set themselves up for the best possible chance at success, or as Imran states “maximum value.”  Much like in business, so many factors are out of our control.  When fighting cancer, it is imperative to dominate the factors that we CAN control!

 

 

 

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